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All over his walls were pictures of the how we were not allowed to study Christianity in our Bar Mitzvah class. You see children, Christianity was made up by a manic-depressant by the name of Saul of Tarsus who wanted to blame the crucifixion of a criminal named Jesus Christ on the Jewish people.

The teacher, (I will never forget this scene as long as I live), Mrs Schecter, who was built like a bull dog, got up in front of the class and said: “Now children. And Saul of Tarsus you should know was a “self-hating” Jew.

When I was 7 they enrolled me in Hebrew School which met every Wednesday afternoon.

My parents, both Jewish, enrolled me in Sabbath School when I was 6 years old.

He hated being a Jew so much that he even changed his name to “Paul!

” Now it happened dear children that 500 years after Jesus Christ was crucified, the Roman Catholic Church took the crazed writings of Saul of Tarsus and made a religion out of it.

I did read about the sufferings of Jesus Christ and it made me cry.

And I did read the ‘crazed writings’ of St Paul and knew that there was nothing ‘crazed’ about it at all - but were words of hope and purpose. But the Christian message is full of promise and life.” When I finished the last Chapter of the Book of Revelations, now at the age of 21, I got down on my knees, wept, and asked Jesus Christ to forgive all my sins and be my Saviour.

I learned later that the Star of David is an occult symbol that was popularized by the Kabbalists of the 13th Century in Europe. But we were forbidden to even mention Jesus Christ’s name unless we used it as a curse word.The term "Talmud" normally refers to the collection of writings named specifically the Babylonian Talmud (Talmud Bavli), although there is also an earlier collection known as the Jerusalem Talmud (Talmud Yerushalmi) or Palestinian Talmud., or the "six orders" of the Mishnah.When referring to the post-biblical periods during which the Talmud was being compiled, those of the Talmudic academies and the Babylonian exilarchate, Jewish sources used the term "Babylonia" long after its geopolitical obsolescence.The Talmud is the basis for all codes of Jewish law, and is widely quoted in rabbinic literature. Rabbis expounded and debated the Torah (the written Torah expressed in the Hebrew Bible) and discussed the Tanakh without the benefit of written works (other than the Biblical books themselves), though some may have made private notes (), for example of court decisions.This situation changed drastically, mainly as the result of the destruction of the Jewish commonwealth and the Second Temple in the year 70 and the consequent upheaval of Jewish social and legal norms.

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